Using w.bloggar for WordPress blogs


by Lid Print

If you want a tool that gives you more formatting features and an easier interface, or you just want the ability to write offline, w.bloggar is one of several Weblog clients that WordPress supports. It is free to use, runs on your machine and uses XML-RPC to post to your blog.

Installing it was a little tricky; here are the steps:

1. Do you already have a blog?

This lets you configure w.bloggar to post to an existing blog, or if you dont have one, w.bloggar will help you set one up.

2. In which tool or service was your blog created?

You need to enter your blog software: mine is wordpress.

It then asks you for an account alias; a name w.bloggar will associate with this particular blog. As it is for your eyes only, call it anything you want. I went the simple route and gave it the name of my blog blogwell.

Step two also lets you set up w.bloggar to ping various sites (let them know) each time you post. EG technorati, bloglog.

3. Account connection settings

This was the tricky one for me, hopefully this configuration info will help you.

The first question is where is your blog hosted.

Mine is – blogwell.wordpress.com

If the blog was on my own Website, for instance http://www.lidija.com, the host would be http://www.lidija.com

Then it asks you for the full path to the API endpoint of your blog tool.

Mine is /xmlrpc.php. If you have a blog on wordpress, yours will be the same.

But, if your blog lives on your Website, for instance http://www.lidija.com/blogwell, the path would then be /blogwell/xmlrpc.php

The default port is set to 80, which you can leave or change for security by clicking the https button; this will automatically change the port to 443.

The next page asks for your login details and you’re done.

Voila
Using w.bloggar for WordPress blogs
by Lid Print
If you want a tool that gives you more formatting features and an easier interface, or you just want the ability to write offline, w.bloggar is one of several Weblog clients that WordPress supports. It is free to use, runs on your machine and uses XML-RPC to post to your blog.

Installing it was a little tricky; here are the steps:

1. Do you already have a blog?

This lets you configure w.bloggar to post to an existing blog, or if you dont have one, w.bloggar will help you set one up.

2. In which tool or service was your blog created?

You need to enter your blog software: mine is wordpress.

It then asks you for an account alias; a name w.bloggar will associate with this particular blog. As it is for your eyes only, call it anything you want. I went the simple route and gave it the name of my blog blogwell.

Step two also lets you set up w.bloggar to ping various sites (let them know) each time you post. EG technorati, bloglog.

3. Account connection settings

This was the tricky one for me, hopefully this configuration info will help you.

The first question is where is your blog hosted.

Mine is – blogwell.wordpress.com

If the blog was on my own Website, for instance http://www.lidija.com, the host would be http://www.lidija.com

Then it asks you for the full path to the API endpoint of your blog tool.

Mine is /xmlrpc.php. If you have a blog on wordpress, yours will be the same.

But, if your blog lives on your Website, for instance http://www.lidija.com/blogwell, the path would then be /blogwell/xmlrpc.php

The default port is set to 80, which you can leave or change for security by clicking the https button; this will automatically change the port to 443.

The next page asks for your login details and youa??re done.

Voila

Advertisements
Categories: Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: